Maximize Vent Positioning for Optimal Air Flow

Maximize Vent Positioning for Optimal Air Flow

Many homeowners believe that closing vents in unused spaces is an efficient way to minimize energy use. After all, there’s no point in letting air flow into the guest room when no is staying there, right? Unfortunately, adjusting HVAC vents isn’t as straightforward as it seems. Making the wrong move could cause energy bills to skyrocket in your Rockwall, Texas, home.

The Danger of Closed Vents

Closing vents in your home isn’t an efficient way to manage airflow. Your HVAC system is designed to send a certain amount of air through the house, based on its square footage. It will continue blowing the same amount of air, whether your vents are open or closed. If you close too many vents, air pressure will build up in the ductwork. This causes your HVAC system to work harder than necessary at getting air through to the house.

A room with closed vents and a closed door will also have a pressure difference. It will suck air in around the doors and windows as best it can, diminishing your energy efficiency and possibly impacting your home comfort by creating uneven hot and cold spots.

Closing Off Rooms Safely

If you feel strongly about maintaining different temperatures in various parts of the house, the best option is to install a zoned heating or air conditioning system. This features multi-stage systems, variable speed blowers, and multiple thermostats that will efficiently manage air flow and temperatures throughout the house.

Positioning Your Vents Properly

The best option with any ducted heating and cooling system is to keep your vents open at all times. This allows optimum air flow for the highest possible energy efficiency. If you want to direct air away from a wall or corner, you can adjust the fins so they’re slightly slanted toward the room that you’re in. Avoid closing the vents entirely.

If you’re not getting the heating or cooling that you want, simply adjusting the vents may not offer the dramatic results that you’re after. Contact Willard Heating and Air Conditioning at (972) 395-5139 to explore more effective HVAC options for your home.

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Understanding HVAC Short Cycling at Your Office

Understanding HVAC Short Cycling at Your Office

You already know that the HVAC system cooling your business in Dallas, Texas, is a central factor in overall efficiency of your company. Keep it running well, and your employees will stay comfortable and productive. Ensure that the system cleans the air as it should, and you’ll all stay healthy.

But without you even knowing, your system could be falling victim to one of the greatest threats to HVAC efficiency and, as a result, your profits: short cycling. By understanding short cycling and the dangers it poses to your HVAC, you can take steps to ensure your profits continue to rise.

What Is Short Cycling?

As your system is running, it goes through several heating or cooling cycles. The first cycle, where the system is ramping up to heat or cool your office, drains the most power and places the most strain on the system. “Short cycling” is when the system spends most of its running time in this startup cycle then turns off before completing the other cycles. This means that the system will continue to turn on and off throughout the day.

Short cycling can be caused by a variety of issues. A system that’s too large for the heating and cooling needs of the building will get the office to the set temperature before the system completes its cycles, resulting in short cycling. Ice forming on the evaporator coils as a result of leaking refrigerant or a dirty filter can also lead to short cycling.

Why Is Short Cycling a Problem?

Since short cycling forces the system to quickly turn on and off, it’s regularly draining more power than necessary. Constantly using so much power in the startup cycle also places greater strain on the system, which will inevitably raise utility bills and reduce the efficiency of the system.

You have plenty of things to worry about without your HVAC system adding to your problems. Don’t let short cycling keep you from the profits you’ve worked so hard to gain. If you’re concerned about your air conditioner short cycling, call Willard Heating and Air Conditioning at 972-395-5139.

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When Is the Right Time to Use My HVAC System?

When Is the Right Time to Use My HVAC System?

Many people in Garland, Texas, wait as long as they can in summer or winter to use their HVAC system to save money on utility bills. However, waiting until it’s very hot or very cold and then turning the thermostat up or down a lot forces your heater or air conditioner to work harder. It could eventually cost you more than using your system sooner. To maximize costs savings when using your HVAC system, you should check your home’s humidity, install a programmable thermostat, and use a variable-speed unit.

Checking Your Home’s Humidity

High humidity makes people feel warmer, and low humidity makes them feel cooler. Even if the temperature in your home seems comfortable, it may feel stuffy if the humidity is high. You can run your air conditioner to prevent this problem. If you have dry eyes, a sore throat, or a runny nose, in the winter, you might have low humidity. To add moisture to the air in your home, boil some water or take a hot shower.

Using a Programmable Thermostat

You can set a programmable thermostat to adjust your home’s temperature when you go to sleep or work and then change it back to a more comfortable level half an hour before you wake up or return home. That way, you’ll always feel comfortable when you’re home or awake and you’ll be able to resist the urge to make your home very hot or very cold. This way, you won’t shorten your HVAC system’s life and you’ll only be using it when you really need it.

Running a Variable-Speed System

Instead of turning on and off constantly, a variable-speed HVAC system can work on a low setting. This is a great compromise when you need a small amount of heat or air conditioning.

Willard Heating and Air Conditioning can help you install, maintain, and repair a variety of heating and air conditioning equipment. Call us anytime at 972-395-5139 for excellent service from one of our expert technicians.

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Lighting, HVAC, and Your Energy Bills

Lighting, HVAC, and Your Energy Bills

You may group lighting and HVAC systems together as home features that impact your energy use, but did you know that one can directly impact the efficiency of the other? Your choice of lighting can decrease heating and cooling efficiency in your Dallas, Texas, home. Making smart choices for illuminating your home can lighten your utility bill.

Heat-Generating Lights

If you’ve ever used a wax melter or Easy Bake Oven, you know how much heat a light bulb can produce. Traditional incandescent bulbs give off 90 percent of their energy in the form of heat. A well-lit room is a very hot room when you’re using this type of lighting. Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and light emitting diodes (LEDs) run much cooler. Use these instead to illuminate your rooms without heating them up as well.

Energy Loss Through Recessed Fixtures

Recessed lights look great, but they’re often added without much thought to energy efficiency. Recessed lights are often installed by making a hole in the ceiling and pushing insulation back in the attic. Lights that are not rated for insulation contact leave a major gap in your home’s envelope.

Fortunately, you can fix this problem without getting rid of your recessed lights. Make sure your lighting fixtures are airtight so your heating and cooling can’t seep through into the attic space above. Use fixtures that are insulation-contact-rated so they’re safe to use with your attic insulation. Install fiberglass insulation in the attic above your light fixtures and make sure it covers the space from wall-to-wall, with no gaps.

Considerations for Natural Light

Using natural light from windows will eliminate the cost of using electric lights. However, windows are susceptible to heat loss and gain. Use windows with a low-e coating to reflect heat. This can help minimize heat loss in winter and keep heat gain at bay in summer, easing the strain on your HVAC system.

Are you looking for more energy-efficient ways to manage your heating and cooling costs? Contact Willard Heating and Air Conditioning at 972-395-5139. We’ll help you find affordable solutions for heating and cooling your home.

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How Do Whole-House Air Purifiers Work?

How Do Whole-House Air Purifiers Work?

From dust to pollen to mold, there’s a virtually endless list of allergens that can contaminate your home’s supply of clean air. Whether your Garland, Texas, household suffers from allergies or you’re simply looking for a way to improve your home’s indoor air quality, a whole-house air purifier can help. Find out how these HVAC add-on components work and how one could benefit your home.

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How to Cool Your Texas Home More Affordably

How to Cool Your Texas Home More Affordably

Summers in Balch Springs, Texas can be brutal. Though the weather’s warm outside, you can keep your home crisp and comfortable. Cool your home more affordably than ever with handy fan hacks and HVAC maintenance tips to keep costs low.

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