Late summer nights in Forney, Texas, don’t offer much in the way of cooling relief. Most people rely on their air conditioners to keep their bedrooms cool and comfortable for a good night’s sleep. Here are some settings to evaluate and additions to consider to make sure you’re getting the most efficient cooling and airflow from your HVAC system.

Find the HVAC Balance Between Comfort and Cost

Some people like to set their thermostat at 67 degrees Fahrenheit to sleep, while others like to keep it at 75 degrees. Sometimes these two people share the same bedroom. Typically, the lower the temperature, the more the air conditioner runs, using more electricity. Maybe your nighttime comfort is worth the extra expense. If you’re concerned about energy costs, however, you might be able to increase your indoor temperature a few degrees and make adjustments for comfort elsewhere, such as the clothing you sleep in or the bedding you choose.

If your unit is 15 years or older, its SEER rating (how much energy and money an HVAC system uses in a year) might not be high enough to cool your house adequately and efficiently. It might be time to consider replacing your HVAC unit with a newer and more efficient model.

Use Fans, Especially Ceiling Fans to Help HVAC

Having air blowing directly on you from a fan can help regulate your body temperature. In the summer, a ceiling fan blowing counterclockwise helps push cool air produced by the air conditioner down onto your skin. This evaporates perspiration, helping you feel up to 8 degrees cooler without having to lower the thermostat.

Use a Programmable Thermostat

Though it might be tempting to crank the temperature up or even turn the unit off while you’re at work, the energy needed to bring the house back down to a comfortable temperature by the time you go to sleep can strain the HVAC system greatly. A programmable thermostat lets you control your home’s settings every hour of the day, so you never have wild temperature swings and can save energy usage for when you need it most.

Some thermostats even learn your movements so they can make fine adjustments according to how you live. Wi-Fi connectivity gives you ultimate monitoring and control, even when you’re not home.

Control Humidity

Sometimes if you’re feeling uncomfortable at night, it’s not that the air conditioner isn’t cooling, it’s that there’s too much humidity in the air, preventing your body from regulating itself with sweating. You might feel clammy or sticky and toss and turn. In a particularly humid climate, adding a dehumidifier to your system might be the perfect solution to balancing your air conditioner’s cooling capability with extra dehumidification.

Analyze Indoor Air Quality

If you wake up groggy and stuffy, air quality might be a culprit. Nighttime nasal congestion can cause you to breathe through your open mouth, leading to a dry, scratchy throat. You’re less likely to sleep soundly when experiencing breathing difficulties, so start with the basics, and check your air filter. If it’s been a while since you changed it, make sure you choose one with a high MERV value to trap allergens and pollutants.

If you’re already diligent about your filters, you might benefit from having an air cleaner installed in your air handler to trap 99.98% of airborne particles.

Inspect New or Unexpected Noises

Do you ever wake up in the night to banging, clicking, hissing, or thumping noises coming from your HVAC? Some noises are normal and part of the system’s regular function. If you’ve noticed something new or are hearing a noise that doesn’t sound right, however, have a technician inspect your HVAC unit for anything unexpected. We can help prevent breakdowns before they become disruptive and expensive problems.

Our trained professionals at Willard Heating and Air Conditioning would love to discuss ways to help you get the most out of your HVAC settings for a better night’s sleep. A yearly analysis as part of our maintenance plan can identify ways to improve efficiency. Call us to schedule one at 972-395-5139.

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